1312 Can An Educational Intervention Improve General Practitioners' Prescription Patterns For Elderly Patients? The Prescription Peer Academic Detailing (Rx-Pad) Study

Conference: 
Author(s): 
Jorund Straand- Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway
FETVEIT Arne - Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway
Sture Rognstad - Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway
Svein Gjelstad - Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway
Mette Brekke - Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway
Ingvild Dalen - Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Department of Biostatistics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1122 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway
Text: 
Oral Communication
Background
Inappropriate prescription practice may impair elderly persons' quality of life and increase their morbidity and mortality. We have undertaken a trial is to evaluate effects of a tailored educational intervention towards GPs to support safer drug use for elderly patients > 70 years.
Methods/design
80 peer continuing medical education (CME) groups (about 500 GPs) in Norway were included to a cluster randomized trial and randomized to one out of two educational interventions implying that they were controls for the other intervention.
The multifaceted intervention comprised educational outreach visits to the CME-groups, work-shops, audit and feedback. Prescription Peer Academic Detailers (Rx-PADs), who are trained GPs, conducted the educational outreach visits. Quality indicators (QIs), i.e. explicit recommendations for safer prescribing for elderly patients, were presented and discussed. Participating GPs provided pre-defined prescription data before and after the intervention from their practice computers and linked to corresponding data from the Norwegian Prescription Database (NorPD). Individual feedback reports were sent all participating GPs during and one year after the intervention, including QI-scores on individual- and group levels, before and after the intervention.
Results
All peer educational groups completed the intervention. Before the completion of the study summer 2007, the second data extraction and a new feedback report will be made and sent the physicians for discussion in the last group session.
Discussion
Our hypothesis is that a multifaceted and comprehensive educational intervention program involving peer academic detailers will be effective in improving prescribing patterns for elderly patients in GP settings. This will be addressed in more details during the presentation.
Literature: 
1312
Can an educational intervention improve general practitioners' prescription patterns for elderly patients? The Prescription Peer Academic Detailing (Rx-PAD) study