438 The Family Apgar Scale And Patients' Preferences For Breaking Bad News

Conference: 
Author(s): 
José Diaz-Benito - Servicio Navarro de Salud
Ignacio. Pérez-Litago - Servicio Navarro de Salud
Clint. Jean-Louis - Servicio Navarro de Salud
Maria. Leon-Diaz - Servicio Navarro de Salud
Ana. Sola-Larraza - Servicio Navarro de Salud
Maria. Hernandez-Espinosa - Servicio Navarro de Salud
Text: 
Poster
Aim
To evaluate the prevalence of primary care patients who would want to know their diagnosis if they were suffering from cancer, and to investigate the factors determining their decision, specially the Family APGAR Scale.
Design & Methods
Design: cross-sectional study.
Setting: primary health care centre.
Intervention: anonymous questionnaire survey was administered to 247 consecutive patients.
Results
Mean age was 51.3 years (SD 18.7). Sixty-three per cent were woman.
Most patients (85.4%) would wish to know themselves if they were suffering from cancer (95% confidence interval, 81?-89.8). However, persons appear more reluctant to disclose diagnostic information to family members with cancer: less than two-thirds (62.8%) thought the patient should be informed of cancer diagnosis. Forty-eight per cent thought the family doctor was the most appropriate person to tell a patient their diagnosis of cancer, and only 20% the family members. The greatest fear of primary care patients is pain (43.9%). Patients' preferences regarding truth disclosure were significantly associated with younger age (50 versus 63 years, p=0.024). Patients' preferences for non-hospital deaths (69.6%) were significantly associated with higher academic education (p=0.028) and younger age (48 versus 57 years, pConclusions
The decisions of primary care patients about end-of-life care are not associated with the Family APGAR Scale.
The majority of primary care patients (85.4%) would want to know the truth if they were suffering from cancer.
Literature: 
438
THE FAMILY APGAR SCALE AND PATIENTS' PREFERENCES FOR BREAKING BAD NEWS