762 Improving Independence And Quality Of Life In Residential Care: A Randomised Controlled Trial

Author(s): 
Ngaire Kerse, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care
Kathy Peri, School of Nursing
Matthew Parsons, School of Nursing, Clinical Trials Research Unit
University of Auckland, New Zealand
Text: 
Introduction/research question
Independence and quality of life (QOL) in residential care are generally low and may be improved. aim: to establish the impact of a goal setting and ADL based activity programme on independence and quality of life.
Method A randomised controlled trial. Setting- five residential care facilities in Auckland New Zealand. Participants- 160 older persons were recruited and wings of the five homes were randomised to receive the intervention or usual care. Intervention- a gerontological nurse specialist enabled the older person to set a goal. With a Physiotherapist and Occupational Therapist and input from the general practitioner, an individualised activity programme based on activities of daily living was designed by the team and implemented by the usual nursing aides. Measures- Life Satisfaction Index measured QOL, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) measured independence.
Results Preliminary results show that quality of life was improved by a clinically relevant amount and independence was maintained. The TUG score was maintained in intervention group participant but got worse for control group participants.
Discussion/Conclusion
QOL and independence can be maintained and improved in frail older long term care residents utilising a multidisciplinary team. final results will be presented and implications discussed.
Literature: 
762 IMPROVING INDEPENDENCE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN RESIDENTIAL CARE: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL