96 (Po) Preventing Noise . Induced Hearing Loss. The Role Of Gp/fd.

Conference: 
Author(s): 
A. Tzanakari, S. Gousopoulos, M. Kouroupi, K. Kanari, C. Dobre, T. Konstantinidis, K. Chourdakis Department of Forensic Sciences, Democritus University of Thrace, Greece
Text: 
BACKGROUND/AIM:
Hearing loss caused by exposure to recreational and occupational noise results in devastating disability that is 100% preventable. Patients who have been exposed to excessive noise should be screened.
METHODS:
Case 1: Screening audiometry performed for a teenage girl during a school physical examination, revealed a 30-dB elevation of hearing thresholds at 4,000 Hz. The audiogram showed a sensorineural loss in a .notch. pattern at 4,000 Hz. The previous night, she was in a concert without hearing protection (HP). Afterwards, her ears were ringing. Several days later, her hearing had returned to normal. Case 2: A 55-year-old factory worker consulted his family doctor because of ringing in his ears and depression. He had no HP at work. Away from work, he had difficulty understanding conversations in crowded rooms. The audiogram showed a high-frequency hearing loss. The audiologist confirmed a sensorineural hearing loss. A hearing aid was prescribed.
RESULTS:
Case 1: A .temporary threshold shift. represents transient hair cell dysfunction and occurs in patients who have had an exposure to excessive noise. Repeated temporary threshold shifts may ultimately cause a permanent hearing deficit. Case 2: Noise-induced hearing loss can interfere with speech discrimination and social functioning.
CONCLUSION:
Noise exposure (occupational/recreational), is the leading preventable cause of hearing loss. By preventing noise-induced hearing loss, patients can reduce the impact of age-related changes on their hearing. Family doctors should educate and motivate patients to avoid potentially damaging noise, use HP and seek treatment for an existing hearing deficit.
Literature: 
96 (PO) PREVENTING NOISE . INDUCED HEARING LOSS. THE ROLE OF GP/FD.