AB416         BENEFITS FROM MUTUAL EXCHANGE OF PEOPLE AND IDEAS IN GENERAL PRACTICE BETWEEN DEVELOPED AND DEVELOPING WORLD

Author(s): 
Heres W, van den Hombergh P, de Wit NJ, van Balen FAM
HELMOND, THE NETHERLANDS
Text: 
Background:
The essential concepts of General Practice such as continuity, availability, listing of patients and integrated care are well accepted around the world. The GP care is generally provided by physicians, while in developing countries much of the daily work in primary care is done by nurses or paramedics. Integrating some of the principles of general practice care and existing guidelines could improve the quality of care provided by these workers. Many GPs who worked for some years in developing countries value this experience for its contribution to their clinical knowledge and skills in daily general practice. The GP working party of the Dutch Society of Tropical Medicine therefore performed a research project comparing parameters of clinical performance (referrals, prescription) and practice management between GPs with and without clinical experience in developing countries.
Aim: Applying the principles of General Practice could also benefit the performance of non-medical health care staff in primary care of developing countries. In cooperation with institutes of General Practice in developing countries we want to investigate what principles of General Practice are most useful and how they can be implemented in a primary care setting with non-medical professionals.
Method: In an integrated workshop results from the research project will be presented and experiences of colleagues presently teaching and working in developing countries will be shared. The presentations will be the basis for a structured discussion around the essential question: Is the concept of General Practice helpful and beneficial for patients in developing countries.