Op-033 An Instrument To Assess The Development Of Primary Care In Countries In Transition; Results Of A Pilot Study For Who Europe In The Russian Federation And Turkey

Author(s): 
Wienke G.W. Boerma1, Dionne S. Kringos1, Ernest Spaan 1, Martina Pellny2
1 NIVEL
2 WHO Europe
Text: 
Aims: The study aimed to develop and test an instrument to assess the state of primary care in countries in transition.
Design and Methods: The instrument addresses functions specified in the WHO Health Systems Framework. Primary care system features are considered as well as service delivery and experiences of patients. Questionnaires, making up the instrument, resulted from literature review and expert consultations. Three questionnaires have been developed: one to assess the national policy context; one for GPs and another for patients. As the Russian Federation and Turkey were selected for the 2007 pilot study, questionnaires have been translated into Russian and Turkish. Random samples of GPs / primary care physicians were drawn, and in each GP's practice, field workers recruited visiting patients until 20 questionnaires were filled in.
Results: In Russia, 52 primary care physicians responded (58%) and 1229 patients (68%); in Turkey 79 GPs (100%) and 1548 patients (98%). In Turkey primary care policy was well developed and family medicine implemented step by step. This was in contrast to Russia were primary care was no general priority. In both countries incentives for GPs providing quality of care were still lacking. Other results focus on: continuing education of GPs; medical equipment; workload; cooperation; first contact care and the provision of medical and preventive services. The pilot also resulted in suggestions to improve the instrument.
Conclusions: The instrument informs decision makers on the state of aspects of primary care, both from a supply side and a demand side perspective.
Literature: 
OP-033
AN INSTRUMENT TO ASSESS THE DEVELOPMENT OF PRIMARY CARE IN COUNTRIES IN TRANSITION; RESULTS OF A PILOT STUDY FOR WHO EUROPE IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION AND TURKEY